Chief Data Officers are growing in number as the Big Data movement matures.

Does your organization need a Chief Data Officer?

Big data has gone mainstream. An estimated 84 percent of organizations worldwide now believe data collection and analysis are integral to business development, according to recent research from the global information services group Experian. The firm also found that 95 percent of U.S.-based enterprises are using data to power operations. Together, these developments show that big data has transformed from a fad into the new normal.

Of course, this analytical sea change is bound to intensify further as increasingly affordable, easy-to-implement technology hits the marketplace. This state of affairs will force businesses with considerable data collection and processing systems in place to ratchet up these workflows, leading to full-scale integration – the final fusion of information technology and operations.

Many organizations are already preparing for this outcome by installing C-level leaders capable of managing the people and processes needed for large-scale enterprise data usage. Analysts at Gartner estimate that 25 percent of businesses worldwide have hired these individuals, most often called Chief Data Officers. But what exactly do they do? 

Understanding the role
CDOs are responsible for developing and maintaining enterprise analytics strategies and the various variables that accompany them, Wired reported. Additionally, many spend considerable time advocating for the use of data in the executive suite and on the shop floor, a task that often proves difficult even in the era of big data. These leaders also manage activities centered on data security and compliance, meaning most must collaborate with Chief Information Officers, according to Gartner. Most are paid handsomely for their contributions, making an average of $192,000 per year, according to Payscale.

"Twenty-five percent of businesses worldwide have hired CDOs."

Understanding the skill set
Like most technically-geared leaders, CDOs should be just as comfortable making connections and running meetings as they are sitting in front of a computer. On the technical side, analytical skills and programming chops are immensely important, as these executives must be able to leverage modern technology to develop data gathering, usage and governance models, CIO reported. Of course, CDOs have to perform these duties with larger business contexts in mind and tap into the strategical knowledge needed to implement their ideas.

Preparing for the future
Organizations looking to infuse their operations with data and ultimately future-proof their business models should consider bringing aboard CDOs sooner rather than later, as recruiting these forward-thinking leaders will only get more difficult as more businesses embrace big data. Is your enterprise ready to start searching for a CDO? Connect with YES Partners today. Our skilled executive recruitment consultants can put you in touch with transformative candidates with the technical skills and executive experience needed to move your business forward. 

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

Businesses are changing their IT recruitment practices in an effort to shore up internal data security resources and protect themselves from hackers looking to invade via IoT technology.

How enterprise IoT is changing IT security recruitment

The internet of things continues to expand exponentially. More than 8.4 billion web-enabled devices are expected to connect to networks this year, according to Gartner. Enterprises will oversee 3.1 billion of these assets, as information technology teams roll out the back-end infrastructure needed to support cutting-edge mobile workflows meant to maximize efficiency and bolster bottom lines. This industry-agnostic push to adopt IoT technology certainly makes sense considering the possible benefits. However, this technology also poses serious security risks.

As the number of enterprise end points grows, so does the frequency of cyberattacks. And sadly, many IoT adopters have already experienced such events. In fact, an estimated 50 percent of firms with these connected devices in place have suffered data breaches, according to research from business management consulting group Altman Vilandrie and Company. This state of affairs has pushed many businesses to change their IT recruitment practices, in an effort to shore up internal data security resources and protect themselves from hackers looking to invade via IoT technology.

Changing recruitment needs
In the past, organizations largely thought of IT professionals as simple system administrators – the individuals in the back room who manage internal networks and answer trouble tickets now and then. This is no longer the case. Now, companies expect IT teams to not only oversee essential hardware and software, but also protect it from digital invaders thirsting for trade secrets or sellable employee or customer information. In short, recruitment priorities have changed.

What kind of skills are human resources personnel looking for? At the moment, cloud security is at the top of the list, as many organizations are migrating enterprise applications and data from on-premises equipment to cloud-based servers, which better facilitate IoT workflows, according to analysts at Gartner. Additionally, a large number are focusing on preventive security strategies rather than protective approaches, as the sheer number of end points makes it difficult to shield company applications and data digitally. Instead, IT professionals must develop and deploy preventive methodologies that hinge on employee education and cutting-edge threat detection technology.

"An estimated 50 percent of firms with IoT devices in place have suffered data breaches."

Addressing the skills gap
Unfortunately, most organizations in need of IT workers with advanced security skills are struggling to find the RIGHT candidates. In fact, only 59 percent of companies worldwide have received at least five applications in response to IT security job openings, Information Systems Audit and Control Association found. The ones that do receive large numbers or responses are inundated with candidates who simply do not have the skills and experience required to do the job. As a result, many internal IT security jobs remain unfilled, putting organizations at risk. The total number of open IT security roles is expected to surpass 3.5 million within the next four years, according to The Channel Company. 

With the number of inherently vulnerable IoT end points growing, enterprises must quickly find a solution to this problem. While third-party data security firms are good stopgap solutions, in-house personnel are best suited to protect sensitive networking assets and the employees and customers who use them. But how do organizations overcome the skills gap? YES Partners can help. Our skilled recruiters can put you in touch with IT security specialists who have the expertise and skills necessary to protect your mission-critical computational assets, from traditional on-premises servers to advanced IoT fixtures.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

Businesses are beginning to embrace AR/VR technology.

AR and VR technology poised to transform the workplace

Augmented reality and virtual reality technologies have gained considerable steam in recent years. In fact, the market for these innovations is expected to surpass $162 billion within the next three years, according to research from the International Data Corporation. While consumer-grade AR and VR equipment is driving much of this growth, enterprises are slowly catching on to the trend and integrating these advanced fixtures into the workplace, according to Gartner.

"Business use cases are broad. In coming years, field service workers, those who maintain utilities, infrastructure, machines and equipment, will benefit because their work is often hands-­busy tasks," Brian Blau, vice president of research for Gartner, explained. "An AR headset can provide visual overlays of diagrams, complex instructions, event recording or enable see-­what-­I-­see remote collaboration. Using AR can improve workforce productivity by removing time-­wasting behaviors or improving the efficiency of tasks."

While these new operational opportunities certainly sound exciting, many organizations might find it difficult to embrace such groundbreaking technology in a meaningful way. Additionally, the complications that come with adopting cutting-edge enterprise technology can overwhelm operational staff and other key internal stakeholders. What can businesses do to prepare for the forthcoming enterprise AR/VR revolution? Lean on executive leadership.

"Enterprises are slowly integrating AR/VR devices into the workplace."

It all starts with the chief operations officer. These individuals must have the awareness and managerial courage required to move forward with potentially transformative technology. Chief information officers should follow suit, working with their technical specialists to develop workable deployment plans that correlate to actionable business goals. Of course, chief human resources officers also play essential roles, creating workplace policies that ensure safe system usage and training programs that equip end users with the tools they need to take advantage of enterprise AR/VR, according to the Society for Human Resource Management.

With leaders like this in place, businesses of all sizes can take advantage of these innovative new devices and catalyze sustainable growth. Firms lacking the forward-thinking C-level leaders needed to embrace revolutionary enterprise technology should consider making changes. YES Partners can help. Our recruitment consultants can connect you with candidates who are willing to embrace exciting new technology in the name of growth.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

  

The continued rise of automation is likely to yield a new leadership position: chief automation officer.

Future roles: Will Chief Automation Officers soon enter the C-Suite?

Businesses across myriad industries are adopting automated enterprise technology. Why? Traditional operational workflows are no longer sustainable, according to recent research from Service Now. An estimated 86 percent of companies worldwide will hit their automation breaking points within three years, the software company found. This sea change will not only affect ground-level operations but also the executive suite. In fact, the continued rise of automation is likely to yield a new leadership position: chief automation officer.

Some organizations have already carved out similar roles, according to Gartner. For example, many manufacturing firms have chief robotics officers – technical specialists tasked with overseeing automated processes dependent on industrial-grade robots. Analysts for the technology research firm predict that 10 percent of businesses with robust production and supply chain operations will staff CROs by 2020.

"Eighty-six percent of companies worldwide will hit their automation breaking points within three years."

The CAO would, theoretically, take over some of these duties, along with the management of automated processes in other business divisions, such as information technology. An estimated 60 percent of organizations consider automated IT processes crucial, according to survey data from Tech Pro Research. Automation is expected to have an impact on human resources, the Society for Human Resource Management reported. Of course, departments like accounting and marketing will also require guidance from the CAO, as both offer ideal use cases for the technology.

When might the CAO role become reality? Automation adoption trends suggest that it could happen sometime soon. As organizations adopt holistic automated approaches, many will look for business leaders who have the technical understanding and executive experience needed to drive enterprise automation from the top down. Businesses can prepare for this inevitable C-level shake up by working with an executive recruitment firm like YES Partners. Our seasoned executive search consultants can help forward-thinking businesses establish long-term recruitment pipelines and sustainable recruitment strategies.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

The growth of enterprise IoT requires a renewed focus on human resources.

HR leaders grapple with workplace IoT integration

An estimated 43 percent of organizations worldwide now use connected devices associated with the Internet of Things, according to research from Gartner. This figure is expected to increase over the course of the year, along with the total number of enterprise IoT fixtures in use.

By the end of 2017, businesses will collectively maintain more than 5.5 billion devices. While this widespread embrace of IoT technology opens up exciting new operational opportunities, it also possess serious problems for internal human resource teams.

Risk accompanies productivity gains
Many enterprise-grade IoT devices are used for tracking purposes, FastCompany reported. This allows companies to collect data on key operational workflows and use those insights to make improvements that boost efficiency and, ultimately, earning potential. However, some organizations are using connected fixtures to track employees as well. Why? For the few enterprises experimenting with this use case, it's all about maximizing productivity in the workplace.

Earlier this year, The Boston Consulting Group outfitted 100 volunteers in its Manhattan office with identification badges containing location beacons and small microphones, Bloomberg reported. The devices record the physical and verbal actions of their users –  data BCG will anonymize and review to better understand how office design affects employee communication.

Of course, various HR risks accompany this approach. Could this information be used against employees? Would the simple act of tracking worker movement disrupt internal culture? These are serious concerns. And, when you add the data security complications that come with introducing IoT technology, the situation only grows more complex, according to the Society For Human Resource Management.

"Organizations embarking on IoT initiatives of any kind must bolster their HR resources to address new challenges."

HR personnel prepare for disruption
Organizations embarking on IoT initiatives of any kind must bolster their HR resources to address new challenges that come along with connected device use, whether it be in the office or on the shop floor.

This may necessitate recruiting new HR managers and representatives who have the technical know-how and people-management skills required to support employees in the age of enterprise IoT.

Is your business embarking on an IoT-based technology initiative and in need of innovative HR personnel? Connect with YES Partners today. Our seasoned recruitment consultants can pinpoint HR leaders with the executive experience and technical skills needed to add a human touch to internal technological innovation. Contact YES Partners to learn more about our recruitment offerings.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

How can car companies survive the electric transition? By finding business leaders with the characteristics required to weather this unique change.

How can car companies survive the electric transition? Recruit the RIGHT leaders

Earlier this week, Swedish automotive giant Volvo announced that it would only produce electric or hybrid models starting in 2019, NPR reported. Volvo President Hakan Samuelsson stated that the company expects to sell 1 million such automobiles by 2025 and attributed the internal embrace of new-generation technology to evolving consumer demand.

Indeed, car buyers worldwide are gravitating toward electric and hybrid models in an effort to cut fuel costs and conserve the environment. This mass movement has generated excitement in the automotive industry, as car companies tap research and development resources to design proprietary green engine and chassis assemblies. However, it has also created uncertainty. Enterprises in the space must now abandon long-held ideas and move into alien territory. How can they survive? By finding business leaders with the characteristics required to weather this unique change. Here are two of these key qualities:

Adaptable
Vehicles have always contained many moving parts. However, electric and hybrid models are considerably more advanced than their predecessors, leveraging advanced electronics and mechanical features to facilitate optimal comfort, driveability and efficiency. These unique design features have catalyzed change on the production floor, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Now, engineers must rejigger their skill sets and embrace innovation to keep pace – and so too should executives. Ever-changing technology drives the automotive industry and business leaders in the sector must be able to design and deploy business strategies that evolve with the product.

"Business leaders in the automotive sector must be able to design and deploy business strategies that evolve with the product."

Collaborative
Electric and hybrid cars depend on core public infrastructure such as government-sponsored charging stations. For this very reason, car makers in the space must not only focus on building vehicles but also work with legislators and other stakeholders to create the infrastructure needed to support these new-age models, Slate reported. Unfortunately, this is not an easy task. In fact, some states are pulling back on incentives benefiting the adoption of electric cars, according to CNBC. With this state of affairs in play, automotive companies must recruit leaders who can effectively collaborate with peers in the public sector and others. While car manufacturers can churn out innovative products in-house, they must work with external parties to prompt real-world use.

Is your organization looking for an executive leader with these skills? Connect with YES Partners today. Our recruitment consultants can put you in contact with the adaptable, collaborative candidates who possess the skills and expertise to help your company move forward into an electric future. 

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

Organizations navigating the health care space must locate skilled leaders who can lead them through this ever-changing technological climate.

Changing health care IT landscape requires new leadership

Technology and health are fully entwined. Today, more than 67 percent of U.S. physicians use electronic health records, according to research from the health care market research firm SK&A. Web-enabled clinical devices are common in wards across the country, as doctors and nurses collect massive amounts of patient data to develop evidence-based treatments. Simultaneously, technology firms engineer newer innovations such as the supercomputer IBM Watson, which can search medical images for tell-tale signs of disease, the MIT Technology Review reported.

With this state of affairs in play, organizations navigating the health care space must locate skilled leaders who can lead them through this ever-changing technological climate. What traits should such executives possess?

Passion for innovation
C-suite dwellers in health care must be willing to experiment with the many new technologies materializing within the industry, according to the Harvard Business Review. As cutting-edge innovations such as machine learning gain traction, hospital and health system leaders should be prepared to engage with these tools and seek out possible use cases, as others in the sector certainly will.

Customer service mentality
The crystallization of patient-centered care – a symptom of rapid technological modernization – has changed how treatments are packaged and delivered. Now, organizations must collaborate with newly empowered patients provide cost-effective care, according to Becker's Hospital Review. Today's health care leaders must recognize this new reality and treat patients as informed customers rather than sufferers in need of treatment, no matter the cost.

"C-suite dwellers in health care must be willing to experiment with the many new technologies."

An understanding of data
Modern health care organizations depend on data, as administrative and clinical teams wade through terabytes of information when moving patients in and out of wards. Consequently, leaders in the sector must be able to address data collection and usage and understand how it affects operations.    

Is your health care organization in need of technology-savvy executives with the skills and experience required to navigate today's clinical climate? Connect with YES Partners today. Our executive search consultants can help you find leaders who can take your enterprise to new heights.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

Widespread adoption of self-driving cars would affect hiring and recruitment patterns in multiple sectors, forcing human resources personnel to alter their practices to account for new operational variables.

Self-driving car development creates recruiting ripple effect

Self-driving cars have received considerable attention in recent years – and for good reason. These advanced vehicles have the potential to transform the transportation industry and usher in a new era of roadway safety and efficiency. Consequently, more than 230 startups worldwide are exploring the technology, Wired reported. Silicon Valley stalwarts such as Apple and Microsoft are also investing considerable funds into research and development activities centered on self-driving hardware and software.

However, the companies paving the way for automated highways and byways are not the only ones who stand to benefit from sensor-laden vehicles. The technology could very well prompt sea changes in major industries such as auto manufacturing, insurance and real estate, according to CNBC.

"More than 230 startups worldwide are exploring self-driving car technology."

Such an event would affect hiring and recruitment patterns in multiple sectors, forcing human resources personnel to alter their practices to account for new operational variables that come along with widespread adoption of self-driving automotive technology. For instance, analysts in the real estate realm believe a nationwide influx of driverless cars could shift property purchasing hot spots from cities to the suburbs and free up hectares of space once used for parking, necessitating the recruitment of new leaders with expertise centered on single-family homes rather than urban developments. The insurance industry is in for an even larger shakeup, as self-driving technology could drastically reduce the likelihood of car accidents, 90 percent of which can be attributed to human error, according to CNBC. Again, this would require the development of new revenue streams and, inevitably, change in the C-suite.

How far off are these developments? Technology firms are still sorting out core the problems that come along with self-driving vehicles, meaning nationwide adoption is most likely years away, The New York Times reported. That said, innovators in the space are working quickly to make automated roads a reality. When this shift does occur, YES Partners will be there to support HR teams weathering navigating the new recruitment environment.     

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

How exactly does automation affect professionals near the top of the totem pole?

How automation impacts the C-suite

For most professionals, the term "automation" brings to mind the image of an immense production facility packed with robots moving in perfect harmony. While this common visualization certainly matches many deployments in the industrial realm, it fails to capture the automated systems that now perform numerous office-based backend duties. Indeed, this advanced software can now be found in almost every department, a situation executive leaders occupying the C-suite must reckon with daily. How exactly does automation affect professionals near the top of the totem pole? Here are some examples.

Chief financial officer
These business leaders are used to performing hands-on tasks, wading through budgets, contacts, profit and loss statements and other financial documentation to pinpoint growth opportunities. While the rise of automation has not reduced CFO workloads, it has changed them. How? More and more enterprises now use automated accounting software to track expenses, PricewaterhouseCoopers found. These advanced programs carry out core calculations on the fly and deliver accurate business intelligence, which financial leaders can use to make spending decisions. Now, CFOs must turn their focus to big picture trends evident in automated data and leave more menial tasks to computerized counterparts.

"Automated systems are bringing change to the C-suite."

Chief marketing officer
Customer engagement is the primary concern for most professionals in this role. Consequently, most spend their time developing outreach strategies and managing the many moving parts needed to execute. While automation has not ushered in ground-breaking change in these areas, it has infused the campaign creation process with data collected via marketing automation systems. A relatively small number of businesses use these tools, according to Venture Beat. However, adoption continues to increase, as marketers unlock the power to collect hard data on customer activity and ultimately craft more targeted assets with stronger conversion potential.

Chief operating officer
Operational leaders are tasked with managing a wide variety of internal processes. From facility management to product delivery, COOs truly do it all. However, some are lightening their loads and achieving greater success through automated enterprise technology, according to TechTarget. How? Take for instance the aforementioned area of facility management. Technology firms now offer backend systems that leverage machine intelligence and connected devices to regulate interior lighting or air conditioning use. This small tweak can greatly reduce costs and leave COOs with more robust budgets.

Automated systems are transforming organizations of all kinds from the bottom up, bringing change to all areas of the business – even the C-suite. Is your firm searching for modern leaders with the skills and leadership competencies required to weather such a change? Connect with YES Partners today. Our search consultants can find you cutting-edge candidates who can take your business to the next level.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

Companies looking to achieve success in this sector must recruit leaders who have the skills and experience needed to navigate this shifting ground.

Executive leadership in the age of advanced transportation

The transportation industry is changing rapidly. Technological breakthroughs and evolving consumer trends are catalyzing growth in the space, as both private firms and the public entities that manage U.S. infrastructure eschew more traditional transit notions for futuristic visions. Companies looking to achieve success in this sector must recruit leaders who have the skills and experience needed to navigate this shifting ground. That said, two specific traits carry considerable weight within today's transportation arena. What might those be?

An urge to collaborate
While business success remains the paramount goal for organizations in the industry, recent developments necessitate collaboration. Increased government investment in private transportation technology is the most visible example. Communities across the country are searching for ways to not only bolster local infrastructure, but develop vast transportation ecosystems based on cutting-edge innovation. In 2015, the Department of Transportation introduced the Smart City Challenge as a way to stimulate further action in this vein, offering $40 million in federal funding to the metro with the most transformative plans. Columbus, Ohio, captured the top spot and embarked on an ambitious initiative that involves multiple private partners, including Amazon, Autodesk, AT&T and Sidewalk Labs, according to the city.

Many U.S. metros are replicating this model, meaning high-ranking professionals in the transportation sector must be able to collaborate with other vendors to achieve success.

"Technological breakthroughs and evolving consumer trends are catalyzing growth in the transportation space."

An eye toward the future
Traditionally, innovators exploring the fringes of the transportation space have struggled to find footholds, with clients opting for long-standing firms boasting proven products as opposed to burgeoning experimenters. This state of affairs has changed in recent years. Now, local and state governments are much more willing to truck with developing technology. Take, for instance, the emergence of Hyperloop, which is in the process of fabricating an expansive vacuum-based train system based on designs from SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk. While the company has yet to produce a full-scale prototype, government officials are lining up to take part in its first public project, Wired reported. The White House has even expressed interest in expanding the technology on a national scale.

The modern transportation environment encourages calculated risk-taking, as more traditional methods have failed to solve many of the larger issue affecting American transit. Consequently, business leaders in the industry must operate with an eye toward the future and strive to push boundaries, no matter how scary that may be.

Firms hoping to carve out space in today's transportation sector must pinpoint candidates with the above traits. Here at YES Partners, we leverage strong industry connections to find these transformative professionals, giving our clients the power to develop long-term talent pipelines for sustained success.

To see some of the roles we have already successfully placed, click here.

Finding people is easy, but finding the RIGHT people is not. YES Partners helps companies FIND the right people for all company functions, across many industries.

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